Sunday, January 14, 2018

Lucid Dreaming Followup

Charles West Brain Group
Second and Fourth Friday of Month
Friday, January 12
at 1:00pm
In the Party Room, Floor 31


We began our session by revisiting Meditation. We enjoyed a guided meditation, and had an interesting discussion, sharing what we feel about it.


One of our members had negative images come to mind during the meditation, and as we shared that, changed them to a positive image of a beautiful sunset. This became the interior safe place.


Lucid Dreaming
We discussed the idea that a lucid dream is one in which the dreamer is aware of dreaming. The dreamer is able to exert some degree of control over the dream.


The Self
We all understood that we need the idea of Objective Self outside our body so that we can use lucid dreaming. We looked at the idea lucid dreaming is another useful tool we can use to influence our mind.


The objective is, as follows:
  1. To change my dreams from losing to winning
  2. Asking a question at bedtime and receiving the answer in the morning
  3. To prompt my body to heal itself: renew; regenerate; rejuvenate


One of us shared a dream from the previous night. Life is hard to bear at present, due to circumstances beyond control, and the dream reflected that. As this was shared, the message broke through into the dreamer’s conscious mind that life had been challenging in the past, but that the dreamer had got though it before, and would do so again. This was such a demonstration of how the subconscious mind gives us messages through dreams. Only we can interpret what is the meaning for us.


Our discussion of these ideas was productive, and everyone is considering using them. We will share our experiences at our next session.


Setting up a Healing Centre
Once again, we used a guided meditation to set up a healing centre within our minds. Some of us built on what we had done last time, others of us changed our images. We are learning to encourage our minds to be still and throw up images for us, to change these images, and to build on them.


In our next session, we will discuss Emotional Intelligence. Below are some links to encourage you to do a little research into the subject.


Daniel Goleman wrote the book, Emotional Intelligence (1995),


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Goleman


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence


https://www.psychologytoday.com/basics/emotional-intelligence



Lucid Dreaming




Lucid Dreaming

Until we make the subconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate. Carl Jung
A dream is a small hidden door in the deepest and most intimate sanctum of the soul, which opens up to that primeval cosmic night that was the soul, long before there was the conscious ego. Carl Jung

We began our session by revisiting Meditation. We enjoyed a guided meditation, and had an interesting discussion, sharing what we feel about it.

One of our members had negative images come to mind during the meditation, and as we shared that, changed them to a positive image of a beautiful sunset. This became the interior safe place.

Lucid Dreaming
We discussed the idea that a lucid dream is one in which the dreamer is aware of dreaming. The dreamer is able to exert some degree of control over the dream.

The Self
We all understood that we need the idea of Objective Self outside our body so that we can use lucid dreaming. We looked at the idea that lucid dreaming is another useful tool we can use to influence our mind.

The objective is, as follows:
  1. To change my dreams from losing to winning
  2. Asking a question at bedtime and receiving the answer in the morning
  3. To prompt my body to heal itself: renew; regenerate; rejuvenate

One of us shared a dream from the previous night. Life is hard to bear at present, due to circumstances beyond control, and the dream reflected that. As this was shared, the message broke through into the dreamer’s conscious mind that life had been challenging in the past, but that the dreamer had got though it before, and would do so again. This was such a demonstration of how the subconscious mind gives us messages through dreams. Only we can interpret what is the meaning for us.

Our discussion of these ideas was productive, and everyone is considering using them. We will share our experiences at our next session.

Setting up a Healing Centre
Once again, we used a guided meditation to set up a healing centre within our minds. Some of us built on what we had done last time, others of us changed our images. We are learning to encourage our minds to be still and allow our imaginative subconscious mind to throw up images for us, to change these images, and to build on them.

Bedtime

We can use our healing centre at bedtime. We can retreat to our safe place and relax on our healing surface, which looks exactly as we want. As we  slowly take three deep breaths, we draw in relaxation and expel tension. We allow the waves of healing energy to flow around us, taking any shape we want. We gently remind all the particles in our body that they will renew, regenerate, and rejuvenate during the night. We drift off to sleep, knowing that our subconscious mind will be working with us to recreate our body. We will wake in the morning refreshed and energized for the day.

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Guided Meditation Followup

Charles West Brain Group
Second and Fourth Friday of Month
Friday, December 8
at 1:00pm
Party Room, Floor 31


Follow-up


Guided Meditation


What a lovely oasis of peace we shared this afternoon!

We began by sharing our experience with meditation over the two weeks since we last met. Everyone found what they had practised had been positive.

The idea of creating a safe space and security shield was explored and we settled into a meditation guided by me. During deep relaxation, we each allowed our imagination to play, and it was fascinating what was the result. Some of us created lovely caves; some of us found ourselves outside in nature. Our pragmatic Janet was in her own home, here in the our building. John was walking along the seashore, the sand between his toes, dreaming of lovely memories. We shared the details of our journeys, and how much we had enjoyed the experience.

The homework was to reflect on what messages we were being given by our subconscious minds by the images created by us. Why did we choose those particular images?

Guided Meditation



Guided Meditation


In my own experience, once I had gained experience with Meditation, I was ready to move forward into Guided Meditation. This meant using creative visualization as another tool with which I gained harmony with my subconscious mind.

I had already observed the improvement in my interior state, of my meditative practice. My thought processes had calmed, and I felt much happier. This peacefulness was spilling over into my exterior life. I could think more clearly, and was more aware of my surroundings, I could be more empathetic to everything and everyone around me.

I was now ready to learn how to use this tool to bring me into closer contact with my subconscious. The objectives of this guided meditation process were twofold, as follows:
  1. Creating a safe space for myself
  2. Creating a security screen around me

Once again, I follow the simple steps leading me into a deep Meditative state. To begin, I settled comfortably into my safe place where I know I won’t be disturbed. I relax completely and wrap myself in the warm blanket of my meditative mind. I begin an inner visualization process.

The objectives of this guided meditation process were twofold, as follows:
  1. Creating a safe space for myself
  2. Creating a security screen around me

  1. Creating a Safe Space

I am walking along a path, on top of a cliff overlooking the sea. The sun is shining and the sea is blue, rolling gently onto the shore below. I hear the seagulls crying, smell the ozone from the sea, taste the fragrance of the seaweed lying along the seashore. As I walk along, I feel more and more at peace.

The path leads onto a flight of shallow stairs, large slabs of stone, bordered by beautiful grasses and wildflowers, warm in the sunshine. I slowly step down; down ever deeper into my warm, safe and peaceful interior world.

There, in front of me, is my Safe Space, deep, deep inside my mind. It takes the shape of an Ancient Greek temple. The columns in front are Ionic, gleaming white in the sun. These columns are draped with climbing roses of all colours, blooming profusely. Peacocks are displaying in the beautiful gardens. I am greeted warmly by my guardian cheetahs, Athena and Ares, and they lead me inside. Music fills the air, and the sweet smell of roses drifts in with me.  This is a magic place, full of iridescent colour, shimmering in the air.

In this beautiful shelter, I can be truly myself; here I can do whatever I want; create whatever I like.

  1. Creating a Security Shield

My protectors, Athena and Ares, lead me outside into the dark sky of space, bright with of stars. I am my Self, hanging suspended, looking down at my inner home, as it shines brightly in the reflected light of the sun. Then I see, forming around my inner home, a shell; a globe, made from elements that nothing can penetrate or destroy. It gleams like burnished steel, glinting with light.

The surface is covered with large thorns, like the stem of a rose. Each gives off a flickering light, warning against touch. Climbing roses tumble everywhere, trailing below the shining orb: red; yellow; pink; and white.  Only I know the secret password that will open the hidden door and allow me entry.

Before you explore further your own inner citadel, it is perhaps wise for you to create your own Safe Space, and surround it with your own Security Screen. As you meditate, let your mind do it for you. You will be surprised and delighted, as I was, with what your imagination will produce.   

Saturday, November 25, 2017

Meditation: Followup

Charles West Brain Group
Second and Fourth Friday of Month
Friday, November 24
at 1:00pm
Party Room, Floor 31


Follow-up


Meditation


After looking at the basics of Meditation as an ancient practice now brought into our times as Mindfulness, we practiced a five minute meditation.


We moved into a discussion of how we all felt about meditation. Carol said that she finds it such a pleasant process, she wants to immerse herself in it. Sandy remarked that she has experienced relaxation in her exercises classes, as her instructor also teaches meditation, but now she understands what it is about. Janet pointed out that when issues flood her mind at any time, especially before going to sleep, she writes them down instead of allowing them to harass her. She intends doing this as she practices meditation. Maureen discovered she has been meditating without giving it a name, and is pleased that she now has the ability to control the process. John mentioned to me afterwards, that he appreciated that the process was made so simple, and natural.

We had such a pleasant time together, and everyone went off determined to practice what they had learned.

Meditation





Meditation


The Greek travel writer, Pausanius (CE 110-180), tells us that "Know Thyself", was inscribed in the forecourt of the Temple of Apollo, at Delphi. This is an ancient maxim that has come down through human thinking for at least three thousand years. Making this decision to understand ourselves more deeply is the beginning of wisdom, and the first step on the narrow path to emotional and spiritual maturity: this is the Quest of the Hero in mythology.


In seeking to know ourselves, it can be useful to see the Self as the core of our being, overlying and containing our body. Self observes our thoughts and actions.  There are many weapons with which to put this resolution to discern our true Being, into practice. Using the brain, which can be seen as our computer, one tool we can use is our subconscious mind.


In the eighteenth century, Freud put forward the idea of an unconscious mind as the repository of our memories of our experiences. Jung developed the idea further, suggesting that there is also a collective unconscious. The French psychologist, Pierre Janet, one of the fathers of psychology, was the first to connect present-day trauma in a person’s life, with past events. He was the first psychologist to use the term, the subconscious mind. Much work has been, and continues to be, done, following on the work of these early psychologists, to deepen understanding of the workings of the subconscious mind, and how it can affect the body, and the life of an individual.


During the 1960s, the New Age movement encouraged people to explore their minds, including the unconscious and extra-sensory perception. This interest has continued to grow, and is now expressed in the idea of Mindfulness. There are many centres where one can learn Mindfulness Meditation, in schools, in universities, in hospitals. One can travel far, to exotic locations, to visit colourful teachers, and spend a fortune to learn how to meditate in their way. You may prefer to attend a university or hospital for classes. This may be necessary for you, or not. You know whatever is best for you. There are many books written by experts; there is much on the internet. You have to follow whatever path you feel is best for you.


To access our subconscious, and learn how to use it, the first step is to practice meditation. This is an ancient practice used to calm the mind, and gain control over our interior life. It is a natural, simple process, that is easy to understand. You have to find your own way to meditate.


To begin, find a place where you won’t be disturbed, and where you feel safe. Sit or lie down in a relaxed position. Perhaps cover yourself with a blanket so that you stay warm. Relax, and let yourself become still. You feel safe, comfortable, warm, floating on a cloud, your mind in neutral.


There are many ways to meditate, some being as follows:
  1. Slowly repeat a simple phrase, a mantra, over and over again. Choose a few words that have meaning for you, such as, “At One”, or “Be at peace.”
  2. Imagine a beautiful flower, see its colour, feel its texture, smell its fragrance.
  3. Imagine a beautiful place. See the vibrant colours, feel the warmth of the sun, hear the birds, perhaps the sound of the sea, or sunshine glinting off a lake.
  4. Listen to music designed for meditation.
  5. Simply listen to your breathing. Breathe in relaxation, breathe out stress.
Choose whatever method you prefer at present. Choose whatever works for you. Change your method as you wish. It’s up to you. You know what is best for you.


Practice this every day, preferably at the same time: perhaps before going to sleep, or on waking in the morning; or at any time that suits you. Start meditating for whatever time feels right for you. Perhaps five or ten minutes. Work up to 20 or 30 minutes.


As thoughts drift into your mind, gently brush them away. Deepen your relaxation. This is your time to be with yourself, and enjoy the peaceful present. Love yourself.


Questions to ask yourself:
  1. How does meditating feel to me?
  2. What have been my practices in the past?
  3. Has it been good for me in the past?
  4. What do I know about meditating?
  5. Do I know enough about it?
  6. Can I research it on the internet?
  7. Will I read books about it?
  8. Do I believe it is the way into my subconscious?
  9. Have I experience with the subconscious?
  10. Do I intend practicing meditation?


It is one thing to learn about any subject. It is another to practice it. To deal with the subconscious mind, meditation is a necessary tool we have to master. We need to work at it. The more you read, practice, and learn, the more you will feel the positive results of your hard work.

Bibliography
You know best which books, videos and courses are right for you. There are many sources of the results of the work of the experts.

Indigo Books

Library